Hard Workout

Luke McKenzie is a professional triathlete.  Triathlete Magazine recently posted an article with his “hardest workout” and it just so happens to be on the bike.  I would love to know what his Ironman Watts are that he puts out!! 🙂

It doesn’t matter if we are professional athletes, age group podium athletes, or recreational athletes…every one of us has a workout that we consider to be a “hard” workout at some point…one that pushes us physically, mentally or both.

Friday I had a VERY. HARD. RIDE.  Since purchasing my new toy a few weeks ago…

IMG_3036

this was the first ride that REALLY challenged me (both physically and mentally).  After having my VO2 Max test at the end of February, I know what my power zones are:

  • Power Zone 1 = 0 -123 watts
  • Power Zone 2 = 124 – 167 watts
  • Power Zone 3 = 168 – 200 watts
  • Power Zone 4 = 201 – 233 watts
  • Power Zone 5 = 234 – 266 watts
  • Power Zone 6 = 267+ watts

Friday morning’s ride was power intervals and looked like this:

  • 30 minute warm-up
  • 6×3 min power zone 3 (mid to high z3) while keeping my cadence above 95 rpm with 2 min easy spin between each set
  • 15 minute cool-down

Typically I have at least one other person to ride with in the sweat cave early in the mornings, but not this time.  I was all by myself.  In my own head.  Staring at concrete walls and a bunch of empty bicycles.

Here is what my performance yielded:

Screen shot 2014-04-05 at 10.44.44 AM

My power and cadence were nearly spot on according to the targets I was to be aiming for.  The first 4 intervals were challenging, but physically I felt strong.  By the 5th and 6th intervals, I really had to use my mental focus, self talk (or yell) and visualization to dig deep and finish as strong as I could.

Before training with power, I was training on heart rate.  According to my heart rate data below, my heart rate was solidly in zone 4 for each interval after the first two and was nearing zone 5 by the final interval.  With power zone 3 being the target, I was forced to work harder, pushing my heart rate much higher than zone 3.  If I would have done this same workout using heart rate, I would not have pushed this hard.

Screen shot 2014-04-05 at 10.44.53 AM

This was only the first of many more HARD WORKOUTS, but I am excited to see where training on power will take me!!

I'm. Beat. Nothing. Left.
I’m. Beat. Nothing. Left. Put. A. Fork. In. Me. I’m. Cooked.
Puddles of sweat on the floor next to the bike = good workout.
Puddles of sweat on the floor next to the bike = good workout.

What is your hardest workout?  Do you train with power?  If so, what improvements have you seen as a result?

——————————————-

Week #13 (Recovery Week) Totals:

Swim:  4700 yards

Bike:  76.2 miles

Run:  21.7 miles

Strength Training:  2 hours & 15 minutes

Hot Yoga:  1 hour

Week #13 in the green 😉

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Pacing 101

With the Indianapolis Marathon just over one week away, I was reminded of the importance of pacing while running my last 20 mile run last Friday night.  So many people start out fast (which is easy to do because of adrenaline and the energy of surrounding athletes at the start line) and then tucker out as the race progresses.

What is my pacing strategy on race day?  For a marathon, I try to take the first 3-5 miles relatively easy, warming up the body and not pushing the pace too much.  After my warm up, I pick up the pace a bit and go with how I feel…pushing my body, maintaining a slightly higher heart rate (low Z3), but maintaining a strong, steady pace.  I also start to focus on people further in front of me that I can pick off and sing in my own head…Another One Bites the Dust.  I continue to maintain this pace and/or heart rate through mile 22 where I then begin to focus on the last 4.2 miles and start to increase my pace and heart rate if I am physically able.

I purposefully try not to run a steady paced marathon as this causes me to go out faster than I should.  My body responds well to a warm-up and then finding that comfortable pace to maintain.

There are many factors that can influence my pacing…weather, lack of sleep, nutrition, stress, mental focus.  One thing I have learned over the many marathons I have run is not to push myself into the med tent on race day.a9a65a0d04ad24d245245c7c168689b3

Another One Bites the Dust…Ironman Kansas 70.3 Race Report

This last Sunday I raced Ironman Kansas 70.3 making this event my 5th 70.3 mile triathlon race finish.  Ironman Kansas 70.3 was my first Half Ironman distance event on June 7, 2010, which I finished with a time of 6:46:24…It was time to go back and see just how far I’ve come in my training over the last 3 years.

Ironman Kansas 70.3 - 2010 Race Results
Ironman Kansas 70.3 – 2010 Race Results

Since then, I have completed Ironman Branson 70.3 in September of 2010 and Chisago Lakes Triathlon Half Distance in July of 2011 and 2012.  I have gotten slightly faster in each discipline of the 70.3 mile distance (although it doesn’t look like it on the run below…bad run day).  I set a new PR for the 70.3 mile distance on July 22, 2012 at Chisago Lakes Triathlon Half Distance with at time of 6:32:44.

Chisago Lakes Triathlon Half Iron Distance - 2012 Race Results
Chisago Lakes Triathlon Half Iron Distance – 2012 Race Results

Going into Ironman Kansas 70.3 this year, I knew I was feeling really good (both physically and mentally), but I had no idea that I was about to SHATTER my previous PR!!

We saw this safety mascot that I named "Safety Sally" on the side of the interstate in Kansas City as we were passing through.  It was fun to see that people still have fun on the job...even when serious work is being done!!
We saw this safety mascot that I named “Safety Sally” on the side of the interstate in Kansas City as we were passing through. It was fun to see that people still have fun on the job…even when serious work is being done!!

We arrived in Lawrence, Kansas on Friday evening and went straight to athlete check-in before they closed for the day.  We then went back to the hotel and checked in, unloaded our car and went to find some dinner, before calling it an early night to get some “good sleep” as Coach Julie calls it 🙂

Athlete Check-in complete!!  I'm ready to race :)
Athlete Check-in complete!! I’m ready to race!!
YUMMY gluten free pizza at Wheat State Pizza in Lawrence, Kansas
YUMMY gluten free pizza at Wheat State Pizza in Lawrence, Kansas

I had every intention of sleeping in on Saturday morning, but I woke up at 5:45 am.  Adam would be so disappointed, but he would also know that this was sleeping in for me!!  🙂 After some breakfast and lounging in the hotel room, I packed up my swim gear (for a pre-race swim), run gear (for a short pre-race run), and Mojo (to leave in T1) to head to the race site.

We left the hotel at about 10 am and drove the bike course before heading to the race site.  Having completed this race in 2010, I had plenty of time to forget just how hilly this bike course was and wanted to get every hill and turn fresh in my mind for Sunday…Oh yes…my nemesis was at mile 50…

There were only a couple of flat miles on this bike course.
There were only a couple of flat miles on this bike course.

After driving the bike course, we ended up at the race site by 11:30 am.  First things first…I needed to get Mojo checked into T1 and scout out my spot in both T1 and T2.  As we were waiting in line to enter T1, I found out we didn’t have to put our bikes in transition on Saturday due to the 60% chance of severe storms over night (with the potential for hail and straight line winds).  I was very pleased with this since the winds were already well over 20 mph and many bikes were being blown over.  Some people decided to leave their bikes in T1 anyway, but I wasn’t one of them…Mojo would be spending the night with me in the hotel room…YAY!!

At Bike Check-in with Mojo on Saturday at T1
At Bike Check-in with Mojo on Saturday…T1

We encountered many athletes from our Zoom Performance team at the race site Saturday and thus talked to many people over the next 2 hours.  By 1:30 pm, we hadn’t really gotten anything accomplished…except my race number tattoos in place…

801...Like 801 Grand, I plan to tower over my competition!!
801…Like 801 Grand, I plan to tower over my competition!!

…no pre-race swim, no pre-race run, no bike check-in (although I did see my spot for T1), no T2 scouting, lots of talking to people…and I was HUNGRY and drained of energy.  I convinced my husband to leave and go find something to eat.  As we were leaving the race site, who should we stumble upon, but Craig Alexander (AKA…Crowie)…

A little pre-race mojo with Crowie...professional triathlete who has won Ironman Kona 3 times
A little pre-race mojo with Crowie…professional triathlete who has won Ironman Kona 3 times 🙂

We left the race site, grabbed a late lunch (3 pm) and headed back to the hotel where I showered, got all of my race gear organized for morning, revisited my race goals, did some race visualization, went downtown for a couple of gourmet cupcakes and then went to bed (at 6:30 pm)…that 3 am alarm clock would be early…

Getting Race Ready!!
Getting Race Ready!!
Gear
Let’s do this!!

In typical pre-race fashion, I didn’t sleep well…every 20-30 minutes I would wake up and look at the clock.  At 2:55 am I woke to look at the clock one last time and decided it was time to get up and do this!!  I had 3 servings of my “superfood” breakfast with almond milk and fresh strawberries and a glass of Trop50 Orange juice, got into my race gear, revisited my race goals, loaded the car (we were checking out before going to the race site) and off we went to the race site.

My Pre-race "superfood"!!
My Pre-race “superfood”!!

There had been storms overnight, but they did not affect the race start.  Arriving at the race site by 4:15 am gave me plenty of time to really get organized and get all of my gear into each transition…yes you read that correctly, the bike to run transition (T2) is in a different location than the swim to bike transition (T1), so I really had to think through what I needed at each transition location.

Everyone had to be out of both transition areas by 6:15 am.  Because I had gotten to the race site so early, this was not a problem for me at all!!  At 6:30 am, the professional men started their race, at 6:35 the professional women started their race and then the age groupers went in waves.  I was in wave 12 and was allowed to enter the water at 7:02 am.  Because this is a floating swim start, we had to swim out to the start buoys and float until 7:04 when the air horn went off.  I love the floating swim start…it gives me plenty of time to acclimate to the water temperatures (and increase the temperature in my wetsuit a little 🙂 ) before starting the swim.

7:04…we were off!!  “OH MY…This water is rather choppy!!”  I was trying to do my bilateral breathing, but it wasn’t working.  I took water in with nearly every breath.  “Flip over on your back and kick…get your heart rate back down.  Ok…let’s try this again, but breathing every stroke with 3 strokes on the right and then 3 strokes on the left…3…2…1…go.”  That wasn’t working either…these waves were getting in my way and I was still taking in water instead of oxygen…not to mention all of the other athletes kicking and hitting around me in the same dilema all floundering for a little air.  “Flip over on your back and kick…get your heart rate down.  Ok…let’s try this again, but breathe only on your right side with every stroke.  This is where you are most comfortable anyway, so give it a try…3…2…1…go.”  Finally something that works…well occasionally!!  “Nice and steady, straight swimming, breathe…Nice groove you are in!!  Keep this up!!”  I continued to stay mentally focused throughout the swim.  As I approached the swim exit, the swim traffic really picked up as athletes of many different waves were all trying to exit the swim at once.  I stood up, ran up the ramp, looked at my watch…”HOLY COW!!  39:05 with those waves…AWESOME.”  I yelled to my husband…”39 minute swim…Wahoo!!” and continued on my way to T2.

39:05 swim for 1.2 miles in rough water...YAY!!  PR number one for the day...
39:05 swim for 1.2 miles in rough water…YAY!! PR number one for the day…

At T2, I inhaled my Oreos, stripped my wetsuit, drank some water, geared up for the bike and was off…4:38 in T1…What was I doing?!?!?!?

Onto the bike…I knew this was a challenging bike course and decided to take it easy out of the park and up the first big climb.  “Keep your heart rate low, stay focused, believe in yourself and your training.”  I was staying focused and really excited about how I was performing on the bike…about mile 18 I dropped my chain on a hill climb, so I quickly put the chain back on and continued to climb…”Remember, focus on what you can control…yes your chain dropped, but it is back on and you have the ability to let it bother you or throw your frustrations in the ditch and leave them on the side of the road…” I chose to leave my frustrations in the ditch and move forward 🙂  I continued to feel strong and in control!!  At the first turn around, I was excited to get around the cone and have the wind at my back…oh yeah…it was predicted to have winds at about 10 mph winds from the WNW, but they were closer to 17 mph with gusts over 20.  “Wind…Kiss Me Harder!! Push me back to the next turn around cone…”  I continued to feel strong and in control of my race.  I was alternating Oreo cookies and Carbo Pro for nutrition every 30 minutes and drinking lots of water, so I felt really good.  “Finally, the 2nd turn around and I can head back to Clinton Lake Campground…YEEHAW!!”  At about mile 50, my nemesis appeared, but this time I was going to conquer it!!  In 2010 I remember struggling to stay around 5 mph while climbing this hill…NOT TODAY!!  I was able to maintain between 9 and 10 mph as I climbed…YAY!!  I have gotten stronger on the bike!!  Time to push into T2…

Coming into T2 from the 56 mile bike ride through the hilly Lawrence country side...
Coming into T2 from the 56 mile bike ride through the hilly Lawrence country side…

At T2, I quickly changed out of my bike gear and into my running gear (or so I thought)…2:57 for T2…WHAT AM I DOING IN MY TRANSITIONS?!?!?!?!?

Oh well…put it behind you, focus and get out on the run!!  I usually struggle to keep my heart rate low when I start the run since I usually start out too fast, but I was able to keep my HR low and maintain a nice, even pace around a 9 minute mile for the first couple of miles.  I was feeling really full off the bike, so I decided to just drink water and suck on orange slices for the first few aid stations, see how I felt by mile 6-7 of the run and reevaluate whether I would consume the Honey Stinger Chews I was carrying.  This plan worked quite well for me and I ended up not consuming anything other than water and orange slices for the entire 13.1 mile run.

Feeling strong on the run!!
Feeling strong on the run!!

While running a race, I typically spend the first 1/2 of the race finding my groove (depending on the distance of the race)…both physically and mentally.  During the second 1/2 of the race, I start to look for people to “pick off” while I’m running.  As I pass people, Queen’s “Another One Bites the Dust” chorus plays in my head…it has been known to escape from my lips on accident a time or two…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNQRfBAzSzo

This experience held true on Sunday during the run portion of my race.  After completing the first loop of the run (only walking through the water stops), I made a pack with myself that I would continue to push forward, finish strong and only walk through the water stops.  This strategy allowed me to pass MANY people on the run and “Another One Bites the Dust” continued to play in my head.  Remember that wind on the bike…well, it made for some good air conditioning on the run.  Adam was in my head…”Kiss me harder wind.”  With only 2 miles to go, I picked up the pace a bit and finished strong…1:59:18…YAY!!

Finishers medal around my neck!!  70.3 miles in 6:05:53...that is nearly a 27 minute PR!!
Finishers medal around my neck!! 70.3 miles in 6:05:53…that is nearly a 27 minute PR!!
Finisher Certificate
2013 Finisher Certificate

I was overjoyed with my finish!!  While I didn’t quite reach my sub 6 hour time goal for this race, I did meet every performance goal that I set out to accomplish and I still had a 27 minute PR on a VERY challenging course…What could make this day better?!?!?!  How about a finisher photo with Hines Ward (professional football player for the Pittsburg Steelers)…

Zoom Performance Athletes and Hines Ward...Congratulations to all!!
Zoom Performance Athletes and Hines Ward…Congratulations to all!!

When my husband asked Hines which hurts worse, getting hit by a linebacker or completing a 70.3 distance event, Hines immediately responded with, “Definitely this!!”

The Triple Brick

Last Sunday I had the following workout:

3x(1 hour ride & 20 min run)…the first set was to be easy (with my heart rate in Zone 2), second set should be a little harder (Zone 2-3) and the third set closer to race pace (solidly in Zone 3).

I was SUPER excited to do this workout and see just how far I could push myself…both physically and mentally.  When I woke up Sunday morning it was dark and gloomy outside…it better not storm…I have been looking forward to this workout all week!!  I looked at the weather forecast and saw that there were chances of severe storms starting after 1 pm, so I knew I needed to get started!!  I had already decided that I was going to ride the same route and run the same route with each set to see if I could get a little farther every time before turning around and heading back home.  This would prove to be a much bigger challenge than I originally thought…especially on the bike!!  Come on Mojo…Let’s do this!!!

Set 1:  I started out on Mojo heading east, then north and finally east again.  When I got to the 30 minute mark, I turned around and headed back home via the same route (west, south and west).  With the winds from the ESE at 13 mph, I thought I would be able to get home a little faster (heading west)…and  I was right.  I ended up riding 14.76 miles in 56:36 (just shy of the planned hour).  This meant my average speed was 15.6 mph for the first ride.  I felt as though it was really easy and I wasn’t pushing hard at all.  I took very little time transitioning to the run…I was shooting for a 9:00 pace off of the bike for the first set.  I started off nice and easy and felt like I was at a pace that I could maintain for a few hours at least.  I was right on pace…I ran 2.26 miles in 20:16.  This meant my average pace was 8:58 for the first run.  I was off to a great start!!

Set 2:  I immediately transitioned back to Mojo and headed out for the second set.  I started off slightly faster on this set than the last set.  I felt as though I was working, but not very hard…little did I realize that the winds had picked up and were now closer to 18 mph from the ESE.  I did make it farther, but decided to ride for 32 minutes before turning around to get me closer to the 1 hour time I was shooting for…this strategy worked!!  When I turned around and headed south back into town, I really felt that headwind…WOW!!  I ended up riding 16.17 miles in 1:01:14, which gave me an average speed of 15.8 mph.  While I was not much faster on the bike this time, I was faster…and every little bit counts!!  🙂  I knew I needed to keep some energy in the tank for the last set, so I quickly transitioned to the run and went out faster than the first set, but not pushing to exhaustion.  I ran 2.34 miles in 20:15.  This meant that my average pace was 8:39…I felt like I could have maintained this pace for quite a while…I’ll take that!!

you can

Set 3:  I again quickly transitioned back to the bike and hopped on Mojo for the last set…Let’s get ‘er done!!  I knew I wanted to push hard, but at a pace I could maintain and I did just that…I made it even farther than set #2 before turning around.  This time when I headed south back into town, the winds were even stronger than during set#2…the winds had increased to 21 mph from the ESE.  I was mentally really strong and focused during this set…”I am strong.  I am tough.  I am strong.  I am tough.”  I rode 17.16 miles in 1:03:04 during my last bike leg…WAHOO…16.3 mph average speed for my last set!!  With my fastest transition yet, I was off and running.  I quickly found a pace that I could maintain, but with difficulty.  I ran 2.35 miles in 20:04, giving me an average pace of 8:33…YEEHAW!!  I DID IT!!

I successfully completed this workout as planned!!  With Ironman Kansas 70.3 only 3 weeks away, this was a HUGE mental boost!!  I was exhausted, but ecstatic…time for food, a shower and a nap 🙂  Oh yeah…the severe storm that was suppose to come…it came later in the day with 70 mph straight winds and tornadoes around us.  Glad I wasn’t out on the bike then…

Numbers DON’T Lie!!

Yesterday I had my VO2 Max Test done for 2013.  Unfortunately, numbers don’t lie.  Last year wasn’t my most successful year in terms of training and racing.  I definitely had a lull in completing my workouts and racing after crossing the finish line at Ironman Wisconsin in 2011.

What is a VO2 Max test???  From an athlete’s perspective it is complete torture!!  As the athlete, you are put on either the treadmill or the bicycle trainer and pushed beyond your limit.  You wear a mask that is hooked up to a sensor which measures the amount of oxygen you inhale compared to the carbon dioxide you exhale.  Yesterday I was on the bicycle.  Every minute, the watts (power output) was increased by 20 watts and I was to maintain the same speed/rpms as close as possible for the entire test.  I got to the point where my mind was saying, “I CAN do 2 more minutes!!”  Unfortunately my body was not able to tap into what my mind was saying.  My legs physically shut down.  They just quit turning over 😦

Another Zoom Performance Athlete completing his VO2 Max test.
Another Zoom Performance Athlete completing his VO2 Max test.

From a coach’s perspective, there is some very useful information that can be used for the athlete to get stronger, faster and more efficient in both training and racing.  The VO2 Max test gives an athlete and their coach the following pieces of information:  Aerobic Threshold (AT), Lactate Threshold (LT), VO2 Max and heart rate (HR) zones.  At aerobic threshold (AT), the athlete is competing at an intensity where the muscles are recruiting the slow-twitch muscle fibers.  This is the optimal intensity for endurance training.  Athletes who train and race at their aerobic threshold will be much more efficient, enabling increased training volume as well as greater frequency and better quality speed workouts.

Lactate threshold (LT) is when the athlete is working at their highest intensity where the body can recycle lactic acid as quickly as it is produced.  If the athlete speeds up just above LT, the athlete can no longer recycle the lactic acid as quickly as it is produced.  This is when lactic acid accumulates and starts to cause muscle fatigue and damage.

VO2 Max is the volume of oxygen that an athlete uses during one minute of maximal exercise.

While all of the above information is very useful and important, the heart rate (HR) zones and power zones on the bicycle will help the athlete train and race at an intensity that allows the athlete to become more efficient.  In other words, “when it is time to ramp up the training and when to back off.”

Here are my heart rate (HR) zone numbers for the bicycle:

HR Zone

Lower HR Number

Upper HR Number

Zone 1 106 bpm 134 bpm
Zone 2 134 bpm 146 bpm
Zone 3 146 bpm 154 bpm
Zone 4 154 bpm 164 bpm
Zone 5 164 bpm 178 bpm

My HR numbers have not changed much from last year, but there were definite changes in my max power output, power output at LT and VO2 at AT from years past to this year.

Year

Power Output at LT (Watts)

Max Power Output (Watts)

VO2 at AT (L/min)

2010

180

220

2.29

2011

220

260

2.7

2012

240

280

2.82

2013

200

240

2.59

My 2013 numbers were directly related to my run focus lately and not as much on my cycling.  This test is proof that I have some work to do on the bike before Ironman Wisconsin 2014!!